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Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Spring 1979"

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



SPRING 



1979 




Student Government: Important Work 




Student Government Is Big Business 



Editor's Note: One of the highlights for Home- 
coming next fall will be a reunion of former 
presidents of the Stout Student Association. 
Names are being researched and individuals 
are being contacted. An overview of the Stout 
Student Association, its past and its present, 
is summarized in the following article. 

Student government at colleges and uni- 
versities is frequently characterized as being 
caught up in planning parties and social gath- 
erings or bogged down with weighty, political 
controversies. Neither description comes close 
to depicting the Stout Student Association, the 
University's primary student governing body. 

With a long tradition of strength and lead- 
ership, student government at Stout is big 
business run by serious and dedicated young 
men and women. 

That statement could be supported merely 
by the size of the more than quarter million 
dollar budget the SSA administers. Yet, stu- 
dent government extends beyond mere finan- 
cial matters to the heart of the management 
structure for the University. 

Though greater student involvement is of- 
ten thought to be a product of the 60's and early 
70's, at Stout, progressively larger student 
responsibility can be traced back more than 
a half century. History is not clear about the 
exact age of student government at Stout, but 
records tend to show that the first organiza- 
tion was chartered in the early 1920's. Admit- 
tedly, student power at that time was minis- 
cule by today's standards. However, early in- 
volvement by students in at least some aspects 
of managing their own affairs has formed the 
foundation for a model system of student gov- 
ernment that has had a major impact in shap- 
ing the character of the University. 

Jim Bowen, administrative director for 
United Council, the UW System-wide student 
government body, said that student govern- 



ment at Stout carries back to the days when 
the University was part of the old Wisconsin 
State University System. Those universities 
tended to have strong student governments/ 
"Stout is a good example of what perhaps nine 
or ten of the thirteen (universities in the UW 
System) are attempting to do in student gov- 
ernment," Bowen said. "Stout is more or less 
what student government in Wisconsin is try- 
ing to do today." 

State law, which forms the present Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin System, provides specific stat- 
utory power for student government organiza- 
tions. For example, students have primary re- 
sponsibility in forming policies concerning stu- 
dent life, services and interests. Students on 
each campus have a right to determine how they 
are to organize and have major control of stu- 
dent activity fees. The law qualifies these powers 
as being "subject to the responsibilities and 
powers of the board (of Regents), the president 
(of the System), the chancellor (of the institu- 
tion) and faculty." But the net effort of the legis- 
lation gives students a considerable voice in in- 
stitutional management. Wisconsin is actually 
the first state to go this far in legally delineat- 
ing student authority at its public universities. 

What this means at Stout is that students 
administer a $300,000 annual activities budget, 
which goes to such far ranging things as sports, 
entertainment, speakers, the student newspaper 
and the campus radio station. In addition, stu- 
dent representatives sit on dozens of major Uni- 
versity committees, commissions and other in- 
fluential groups. The SSA president is an ex- 
officio member of the Chancellor's Council, one 
of the top administrative bodies on campus. 

Representation on the SSA is drawn from 
throughout the student body. Each residence hall 
has one senator; Greek organizations and gradu- 
ate students are represented; there are on-campus 
senators and senators at large. 



Student governments in the former Wiscon- 
sin State University System were influential in 
having student authority included in the merger 
law. For some university administrators, this 
amount of shared authority with students has 
been a source of irritation. A few officials at 
other universities have made subtle attempts to 
resist it. Not so at Stout. Here the idea has been 
welcomed, encouraged and expanded beyond the 
statutory requirements. While students may 




"To be affective you 
have to give everybody 

the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in decision mak- 
ing"' 



Wood 



benefit from this expanded role in university 
governance, it has actually done much to im- 
prove the operation of the entire University. 

Sam Wood, Dean of Students, explained that 
it is desirable for the institution to involve stu- 
dents in the decision-making process. "If any- 
one thinks that a university can function with 
all the decisions being made by one group of 
people, then there are some faults in their rea- 
soning," he said. "To be effective, you have to 
give everybody the opportunity to participate 
in decision making." Although the University 
administration still retains the legal authority 
for nearly all final decisions, involving students 
in the process makes those decisions more ef- 
fective. "The fact that students can participate 
prior to the decision is a very significant part 
of it," Wood said. "The fact that student opinion 
is sought, makes students feel a part of the Uni- 
versity." 

Chancellor Robert S. Swanson agrees. "The 
more people you can involve in your operation, 
the stronger it is going to be, if there is some 
direction to it," he said. "When student govern- 
ment has planned something, set the policy and 
carried it out, they obviously are going to make 
every effort to see that it works." 

Dave Conn, the current SSA president, says 
the organization focuses on specific issues and 
concentrates efforts in the areas that can be 
most effective. "The nature of student govern- 
ment here at Stout is that we don't get caught 
up in peripheral issues or run off simply on one 
issue," he said. "But the big issue is education, 
that's what we are trying to improve. We are 
concerned about education, not only in the class- 
room because education in the classroom is af- 
fected by so many outside things. The politics 
of a university affect the curriculum of the uni- 
versity, so we are concerned with education, but 
we also realize that there are so many factors 
that affect it." 

Conn said that students have discovered that 
through perseverance and patience, things really 
can be accomplished. "I like to call it the tread- 



mill affect," he said. "It's a continual effort. I 
really believe in the system and I believe that 
it works." 

The numerous recent achievements of stu- 
dent government illustrate Conn's feelings. They 
range from such simple things as setting up a 
free duplicating service in the Student Center 
to major responsibility of recommending names 
for appointments to University committees. Stu- 
dents have set up their own course in leadership 
in which participants earn academic credit while 
learning leadership roles. The Board of Academic 
Affairs gives students a greater say about the 
educational offerings of the University. Better 
management of activity fees has resulted from 
improvement in the University Activities Board. 
Students have set up a landlord/tenant union in 
which both renters and property owners can de- 
fine their responsibilities and voice their con- 
cerns. Using local attorneys as volunteers, the 
student government offers a free legal referral 
service. 

One long-standing self-defined role of student 
government has been to promote a sense of "com- 
munity" within the University as well as the city. 
To promote ' this, all University employees are 
now eligible to vote in student elections. 

Students also feel a responsibility for creat- 




"The nature of student 
government here is that 
we don't get caught up in 
peripheral issues" 



ing a favorable image of Stout. "We believe that 
we have an obligation or responsibilities to pro- 
mote the University," Conn said. "If we didn't 
believe in the University, most of us wouldn't 
be here." 

Scott Cabot, immediate past SSA president, 
expresses similar feelings. "Our philosophy here 
is different from other campuses," he said. "I 
think (student government) should be a promoter 
of the University. A lot of us are in student gov- 
ernment because we believe in the University; 
we want to improve it." Cabot said that in some 
respects student government has a "watch dog" 
role to play. "You have to be a sort of independent 
force, but you have to be part of the system," he 
said. 

Another way student government has exerted 
its influence is through recently expanded lob- 
bying efforts in the state legislature. "It has al- 
ways been a problem of whether to lobby for the 
social issues as opposed to pure educational is- 
sues," Cabot said. "We've stuck mainly with edu- 
cational issues but have jumped into social is- 
sues if they affect students." Some of the legisla- 
tion for which students have lobbied deals with 
tuition, landlord/tenant rights, collective bar- 
turn to page 4 



i i 



Students are more aware of students' needs" 



continued from page 3 

gaining for faculty, the drinking age, and the 
decriminalization of marihuana. "Actually, I 
think all of this is another example of our de- 
sire to work within the system," Cabot said. 

Many of the people interviewed for this arti- 
cle spoke of student government at Stout as "the 
best in the UW System." That obviously biased 
viewpoint gains some credence from the fact that 
in 1977, student government at Stout became 
the first recipient of the John C. Weaver Award 
for Outstanding Participation in Shared Gover- 
nance. 




e regarded ourselves 
part and parcel ©f the 
i¥ersit¥"' 



Swarsson 



Undoubtedly, there are many factors that 
have helped shape the organization into what 
it is today. Perhaps no one had more impact than 
did the late Merle Price, who served as Dean of 
Students from 1929 "until his retirement in 1971. 
Price's careful guidance and patient leadership 
in the growth of the organization has surely had 
a lasting impact on the University. "Students 
are more aware of students' needs than anybody 
else," Price once said. "By and large if students 
are given the responsibility, they will accept 
it." 

William J. Micheels, former chancellor and 
president at Stout, holds considerable responsi- 
bility for promoting a more direct involvement 
of students in the management of the institu- 
tion. 

"Students are reasonable when treated rea- 
sonably," Micheels once said at a student gather- 
ing in which he called for "meaningful partici- 
pation." He said that all groups in the Univer- 
sity — faculty, students and administration — 
must be heard and must share in policy forma- 
tion. "If we can build on the concept of mean- 
ingful participation, we can engender a climate 
in which useful criticism will be accepted and 
acted upon by administrators, faculty and. stu- 
dents," he said. "Each group has rights and each 
group has responsibilities." "The exceptions one 
can point out are simply that — exceptions," he 
said. 

When Swanson became chancellor in 1972, 
he continued and expanded philosophy that Mi- 
cheels expressed. As a student, Swanson was 
president of the SSA in v 1949 and over the years 
as faculty member and administrator in various 



areas, he has continued to maintain close con- 
tact with students. 

Guy Salyer, who was an advisor to the or- 
ganization for some 25 years, until retirement 
in 1975, said student government has been most 
active in the past 15 or 20 years. "It's a tendency 
all over the country for democracy in action," 
he said. "The students think they ought to have 
responsibility. They are learning by taking on 
responsibility." Salyer added that he views stu- 
dent government as training for the future. "It's 
training for citizenship, understanding problems, 
diagnosing problems, going into those problems 
and coming up with solutions," he said. 

The degrees of authority and levels of sophis- 
tication for student government at Stout have 
gradually risen over the years. At least some of 
the changes reflect more liberal viewpoints of 
society in general. 

George Decker, who was SSA president in 
1928, recalls that student government had "prac- 
tically no voice" back then. "The word came down 
from the president to the dean and the dean to 
the faculty," he said. "As students, we didn't dare 
make odd moves or we were out. There were no 
big issues back then. It was pretty straight. We 
weren't interested in social movements that de- 
veloped in later years." 

Elmer Clausen, SSA president in 1939,' said 
things had not changed that much by the time 
he was elected. "We had so little power that I 
can't even really remember it," he said. "I had 
a lot more power as editor of the Stoutonia than 
I did as student body president." Clausen ad- 
mitted that he likes to imagine what it would be 
like to be an SSA president today. "It would have 
been fun to have been president now," he said. 
"It would be much more meaningful." 

World War II may have caused one of the 
most dramatic changes in how student govern- 
ment operates. Returning veterans who were old- 
er and more mature, wanted greater control of 
their own affairs. "Before the war (student gov- 
ernment) was more social," recalled Frank Dum- 
mann, SSA president in 1946. "The push came 
after the war. Students wanted a say in things. 
They didn't want things crammed down their 
throat. It wasn't a clamour for power but a de- 
mand for more rights." He explained that veter- 
ans were unwilling to tolerate many of the old, 
restrictive rules of the institution. "These vets 
wanted some of the rules changes to meet their 
more adult behavior patterns," Dummann said. 
"Here they were over in Europe and dodging bul- 
lets and then they were back in college and be- 
ing told what they had to do." 

Swanson recalled that by 1949, students be- 
gan to feel more of a partnership with the Uni- 
versity. "We regarded ourselves as part and par- 



eel of the University; we were never in opposi- 
tion to the faculty or administration," he said.. 
"I guess we always figured that the faculty and 
administration were really in charge of the place 
and we were the students. But we had a lot of 
freedom to do things, too, and to promote ideas." 
Helmuth Albrecht, who was student body 
president in 1959, said students then were less 
vocal. "This is partially because we weren't as 
aware of what was happening," Albrecht said. 
"But, I always felt that there was an opportunity 



to step forward, although not nearly as much as 
there is today," 

There is certainly no way of knowing where 
student government will be at the end of its next 
50 years of operation. But, there is good reason 
to believe that it will continue to occupy an im- 
portant place at Stout. "Its role has varied over 
the years," Cabot said. "It's constantly changing 
to meet the needs of the times and the conditions 
of the times." 



Students Join Chamber of Com 



i i i t ; I U 



Tbe student body at Stout has joined the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. By a unanimous vote in the Stu- 
dent Senate, the University's 7,000 students are 
now official members of the Menomonie Area Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

Pete Ptacek, vice president for legislative af- 
fairs in the Stout Student Associa- 
tion, said the move is a logical one. 
'I personally don't think it is that 
unusual," he said. "I think it is some- 
thing that should have been done 
a long time ago." 

Jim Weingart, executive director 
of the Chamber of Commerce, said 
that when the idea was first pro- 
posed to him he was "surprised and 
shocked." But Weingart was quick 
to endorse the plan. "My reaction 
is one of pure delight," he said. "It- 
is a delight to have students con- 
cerned enough about the town to become this in- 
volved." 

Weingart acknowledged that this may reflect 
an overall positive change in attitude by students 
toward business. However, he sees it as a "natural" 
for the Stout student body, where man}' of the stu- 
dents are enrolled in majors designed to prepare 
them for careers in business and industry. "Most, 
students coming here have definite goals in life," 
Weingart said. "They know what they want to do 
and appear to be a lot more serious minded; and, 
therefore, better able to relate to the business 
community." 

Kevin Wanecke, former media and advertising 
coordinator for the Student Senate, said that after 
Weingart. explained the Chamber of Commerce pro- 
gram to the Student Senate, it passed easily with 
a 21 to vote. The $75 membership fee comes from 
student activity funds, which are controlled bv the 




Senate. Dave Conn, Senate president, is the official 
voting member of the Chamber, although all stu- 
dents may participate in Chamber activities. 'The 
Stout Student. Association represents the student 
bod}'," Ptacek said. "The decisions we make are l'o> - I 
the majority of the students. We joined the organiza- 
tion because we felt it would be in the best interest 
of all students." 

Ptacek pointed out. that Stout, was the largest 
industry and employer in Menomonio. "It was only 
practical to do this," lie said. "We have a big im- 
pact on the city." 

Ptacek and Wanecke agree that reaction from 
'the students has been positive. The two maintain 
that membership provides mutual benefits to both 
the student body and the Chamber. "This can help 
merchants understand how students feel about 
them," Wanecke said. "We do add a lot to then- 
business." Ptacek added that, it is also 9 good in- 
vestment for the students. "The Chamber of Com- 
merce has many activities that we had not previ- 
ously heard about," he said. "This keeps us better 
informed." He added that it may provide students 
with opportunities for work experience, something 
they will need to help them land jobs after gnulua- 

Ptacek hopes to work with the Chamber's legis- 
lative committee and to do some joint lobbying on 
certain issues. "We won't always agree but at least 
we'll have input," he said. "In return, area business- 
men will get a viewpoint they never had before. We 
will be talking to them from the other side of the 
counter." 

Ptacek also hopes that the affiliation with the 
Chamber will give students a better picture of the 
free enterprise system. "We are all going to belong 
to the system eventually, so we might as well get 
involved now," he said. 



Printing: Part of Modern Living 



The Graphic Arts Department at Stout and the 
Stout Typographical Society stress the importance 
of printing to everyday life. 

From newspapers to books, road signs to watch 
dials, cereal boxes to wallpaper and Christmas cards, 
the scope of graphic communications almost defies 
limitations, according to department spokesmen. Be- 
fore an item reaches the printing press, a number of 
persons are involved in its development, including 
commercial artists, copywriters, photographers, photo 
typesetters, litho artists, camera operators, strippers, 
platemakers, photo engravers, bindery personnel, sales 
representatives, estimators and production managers. 

The sophisticated science of electronics also ap- 
pears in printing, with computerized word processing 
and photo typesetting, quality control and cost analy- 
sis. 

Even chemists derive jobs from printing: new inks 
are being made to improve the finished printed prod- 
uct. 



Throughout the year, Stout Typographical Society 
students attempt to finance a special three-day spring 
field trip and special library books by producing print- 
ed products for campus organizations. 

They print student resumes, promotional buttons 
and t-shirts for dormitory residents, and this year did 
job work for the Wisconsin Early Childhood Associa- 
tion, Wisconsin Industrial Education Association, Cor- 
ner III menus and the full color reproduction of the 
game, "Monotony," produced by the Stout Manufac- 
turing Laboratory. 

Course work for industrial technology or industrial 
education majors who concentrate in graphic arts, 
includes theory and lab practices in nine major areas 
of graphic arts. Some of the courses are introductory 
graphic arts, typography, composition, line and half- 
tone photography, image transfer, general binding 
and finishing, printing economics, graphic arts pro- 
duction techniques and color separation. 




stripping negatives 










offset plates ready to run 






setting ink balance on press 













■ ."■' ''.^..iiv'-i'-v: 



liiiiiili 

lilllillll 



checking a printing stencil 



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•.'aiAv7 _ ii -- si ! ! 'l~'' 










A 



W — |i — |i — -\ A;- -v >; 





copy off the press 



setting type 



Class Notes 



1916-1967 

WILLIAM H. HAMILTON Dip '16, BS 
'27 has a hobby shop. He repairs furniture 
and builds childrens' rocking chairs. 

ELIZABETH CHRISTOPHERSON 
TAYLOR '35 a home economics teacher 
at Longfellow Junior High School in La 
Crosse, was presented a certificate of ap- 
preciation by Stout for her work as a co- 
operating teacher. She has supervised 95 
Stout student teachers over the years. 

L.T. '36 and RUTH HOSSMAN OASS 
'35 have recently retired and now reside 
in Lantana, Fla. 

CLARENCE BS '36, MS '49 and LOIS 
STYER BEAUCHAMP '37 are now com- 
pleting six years at the University of Pe- 
troleum and Minerals at Dhahran, Saudi 
Arabia. 

SYDNEY C. SCOVILLE BS '39,' MS 
'63 retired after 38 years of teaching at 
Oshkosh West High School. 

JOSEPH WEBER BS '50, MS '54 is 
an aeronautics instructor at Willowbrook 
High School, Villa Park, 111. 

ARLYS HAMANN HAWKES '55 is 
employed at the Lake Mills Leader news- 
paper. 

GEORGE K. STEGMAN BS '55, MS 
'57 is a professor in the industrial engi- 
neering department, graphics and design 
group at Western Michigan University, 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 

EARL LEHMAN BS '57, MS '63, a vo- 
cational instructor at Wenatchee, Wash. 
High School, received an award of merit 
at the North Central Washington Boy 
Scout Council's annual banquet not only 
for his years of service but for a few min- 
utes last month that saved two Moses Lake 
hunters from drowning. 

ELDRED E. MANSKE '58 is a draft- 
ing instructor at Western Wisconsin Tech- 
nical Institute in La Crosse. 

LOUIS E. MILSTED BS '59,' MS '60 
has been cited by the National Eagle Scout 
Association for outstanding leadership in 
scouting and the development of Eagle 
Scouts. He is the first recipient of the 
award in the Bay Lakes Council, Boy 
Scouts of America. 

ROBERT '62 and DARLENE BRENI- 
EM WERNSMAN '62 reside in Dahlgren, 
Va. He was promoted to commander in the 
Navy and moved to the Naval Surface 
Weapons Center where he is working in 
the testing and evaluation section of the 
gunnery department. 

WILLIAM BS '63, MS '64 and JUDITH 
HESS NIEDERBERGER '62 reside in 
Verona. She is operating "The Recovery," 
a small upholstery shop, assisted by her 
husband after his teaching hours at Madi- 
son West High School. 

DON '63 and SANDY WHYTE 
SCHLEI '64 own a Sound World Store in 
Sheboygan. 

FRANK '63 and NANCY LANG TOTH 
'63 reside in Munster, Ind. He was named 
in the Marquis Who's Who in the Midwest 
1978-79 issue for his work in industry and 
community. He is working as operations 
manager for Slugger Corp of America, 
Hammond, Ind. 



DONALD VANDE HEI BS '64, MS '73 
is an audio-visual specialist in Miami, Fla. 

CHARLES '65 and KATHLEEN 
DUEBNER LAGERBERG '64 reside in 
Bay City, Mich. He is a shop teacher in 
Bay City School System for seventh and 
eighth graders. She demonstrates Pana- 
sonic microwave ovens in area stores and 
also conducts cooking schools. 

RUSSELL B. WURZ '66 is a facilities 
planning project engineer II for Oscar 
Mayer and Co., Madison. 

JOHN REBB MS '67 is the 1978-79 
president of the Central Arizona Indus- 
trial Education Association and 1978-79 
vice president of the Arizona Industrial 
Education Association. 

EMILY MINNICHSOFFER BS '67, 
MS '78 has been named the Home and 
Family Services Division chairperson at 
the University of Minnesota Technical 
College, Crookston. 

MICHAEL CHIAPPETTA '67 was re- 
cently promoted to manager of contracts 
and financial analysis at Sperry Univac's 
Defense Systems Division in St. Paul. 

WILLIAM D. MUELLER MS '67 is an 
instructor at the U.S. Air Force Academic 
Instructor School, Montgomery, Ala. 



1968-1971 

BARBARA CUMMINGS NIENOW 
'68 has been named Merrill area agent for 
North Central Technical Institute. 

DENNIS HOLT '68 is a professional 
engineer with Northern States Power Co. 
in consumer affairs. 

PAUL J. KRIZ '68 is a systems project 
supervisor at American Motors Corp. head- 
quarters in Southfield, Mich. 

CARLA ANN HAYES OLSON '68 is 
the assistant manager of Ramada Inn in 
Rockford, 111. 

DOUGLAS KEES '68 is employed by 
the Sauk-Praire School District as an in- 
dustrial arts teacher and is assistant wres- 
tling coach at the middle school. 

MICHAEL DUNFORD '68 was ap- 
pointed vice president and managing of- 
ficer of the Lamalie Chicago office of La- 
malie Associates, Inc. 

SUSAN PLEETHAM FOLEY '68 is 
involved with the Parent-Teacher Orga- 
nization at the American Community 
school in London, England. 

CHARLES HANF BS '68, MS '73 has 
been named as district teacher of the year 
at Washington High School in Two Rivers. 

TIM DOMKE '69 accepted a new posi- 
tion as head college basketball coach, and 
coordinator of public relations at Orchard 
Lake's St. Mary's College in Michigan. 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus is an official publication 
of University of Wisconsin-Stout. II is 
published quarterly. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Roberta Obermueller , . . . Ass't. to the Editor 

Carol Richard Class Notes 

The Stout Alumnus is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the Univer- 
sity. It Is entered at the post office 
Menomonie. Wis., as third class matter. 
Jack Wile Alumni Director 



RICHARD A. REINDL '69 has been 
named sales representative for Pilot Print- 
ing and Publishing Co., Wausau. 

THOMAS A. BOHN '69 accepted a new 
position as sales and service engineer with 
the Valeron Corp. 

GERALD BS '69, MS '71 and JANICE 
NEIMETZ SCHWARZ BS '70, MS '71 
reside in Muskego. He is teaching woods 
at Central High School in West Allis. She 
is teaching decorative oil painting for 
Waukesha County Technical Institute. 

DANIEL C. SHERRY BS '69, MS '71 
is a rehabilitation services coordinator/ 
work adjustment for the Lakeland Facility 
of Goodwill-Lakeland. 

PATRICK BS '70, MS '72 and SARA 
DONNELLY SCHNEIDER '69 live in 
Omaha. He has accepted the position as 
training director with Pamida, Inc. 

BARRY BS '70, MS '76 and BONNIE 
DONNELLY BERSTEIN '69 reside in 
Glendale. He is head wrestling coach at 
Whitefish Bay High School. She is a quilt- 
ing instructor for Milwaukee Area Tech- 
nical College and a teachers aide at Mil- 
waukee Art Center. 

MICHAEL SCHEMELIN '70 has tak- 
en an engineering position with the Roper 
Corp. in Illinois. 

DUANE STEVENS '70 earned desig- 
nation as certified purchasing manager by 
the National Association of Purchasing 
Management. 

CURTIS PETERS '70 is a sales repre- 
sentative for the Forest Products Division 
of Ownes-Illinois and resides in Omaha, 
Neb. 

ROBERT MC CORD BS '70, MS '71 
received his doctorate from the Univer- 
sity of Nevada. 

RAY D. RYAN, JR. '70 has assumed 
a new position as the deputy superinten- 
dent of public instruction for the state of 
Nevada. 

SUZANNE DEAHL BS '70, MS '72 is 
teaching home economics at Sycamore 
High School, Sycamore, 111. 

RAY BUTTERFIELD '70 is teaching 
metals and electricity in the Cornell High 
School. 

CLIFTON NEWBERRY MS '70 is the 
director of the Buckeye Skill Center, Buck- 
eye, Ariz. 

DENNIS PETERSON '70 is a new 
sales representative for Employers Insur- 
ance of Wausau's Rhinelander office. 

DENI "PETER'' PETRARKIS 71 as- 
sumed a new position as director of cater- 
ing for the New Four Seasons Hotel of 
Georgetown, Washington D.C. 

PHDLLIP ZUKE '71 has accepted a new 
position as food service manager at Vin- 
cennes University, Vincennes, Ind. 

LAWRENCE EARLL '71 is a regis- 
tered architect at President Earll and As- 
sociates, Ltd. 

MARY LARKIN SCHEEL '71 has 
joined the staff of McKy-EUis Realty Co. 
Inc. of La Crosse. 

NEAL DELARUELLE '71 has ac- 
cepted a new position as territory man- 
ager of business management systems with 
the Burroughs Corp., Green Bay. 

JUDITH BECKER '71 is a LPN and 
inpatient counselor for Glenridge Emer- 
gency Services. 



RON BS 71, MS '76 and CAROLE 
DENNISON MOEDE MS '76 reside in 
Greenville, S.C. He is teaching industrial 
education at Greenville County Museum. 
She owns and manages the Frame Peddler, 
a custom picture framing and art gallery. 

WILLIAM EHLERT '71 is a district 
engineer for the L.E. Myers Co. in Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

MARY LEPESKA 71 recently received 
a master's degree in home economics jour- 
nalism at UW-Madison. She is an exten- 
sion home economics radio specialist at 
UW-Madison. 

JEFF '71 and JUDILYN HANSEN 
MC GOWN BS '70, MS '71 reside in Mus- 
kego. He was appointed to Federal IRS 
appeals staff in Milwaukee. She is a part- 
time teacher and swim coach at Shore- 
wood. 

TOM J. NEMECKAY '71 was recently 
promoted to plant superintendent corre- 
lating technical duties, as well as super- 
visory at Neroosa Foundry in Neroosa. 

DONNA LAFFERTY PRIEBE '71 is 
a home economist working in Sears Test 
Laboratory in their small appliance divi- 
sion. She also lectures to various women's 
groups on fitting commercial dress and 
pants patterns. 

JEAN JACOBSON TOPPER '71 was 
hired by the Blackhawk School District. 
She is the teacher in charge of the pre- 
school program. 

1972-1973 

ROBERT K. WOELFEL '72 is general 
manager of Kitty Hawk's Restaurant in 
New York City, N.Y. 

DIANE KUEHN '72 is president-elect 
of Wisconsin Association Secondary Dis- 
tributive Education Teachers for the 1979 : 
80 school year. 

LARRY CARLSON '72 accepted a job 
as a manufacturing engineer for TRW 
Cinch Connectors in Minneapolis. 

CATHERINE MEHRING BS '72, MS 
'74 is teaching at Mt. Carmel Academy 
in New Orleans. 

MARGARET MEYER MS '72 recently 
began duties as the division chairperson 
of developmental services at the College 
of Lake County, Grayslake, 111. 

JAMES BONLENDER '72 is teaching 
mentally retarded adults in the Anoka 
County Developmental Achievement Cen- 
ter, Blaine, Minn. 

PETER '72 and JACQUELYN WORM 
ZOELLMER '72 reside in Marshfield. He 
is an inventory supervisor for Kindt Build- 
ing Products, Marshfield. She is a home 
economics instructor at Granton Public 
Schools. 

DENNIS R. HUBERT '72 is general 
manager of Fort Collins Country Club in 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

SUSAN NIEBAUER ZIEBELL BS '72, 
MS '73 is District 5 administrative as- 
sistant with Ruan Transport Corp. of Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

PHILLIP BOISE '72 owns and oper- 
ates the Eagle Inn, a restaurant-tavern in 
Elkhart Lake. 

TOM GOLDEN BS '72, MS '77 is a 
building trades instructor at Graves Lake 
High School. He resides in Mundelein, 111. 

LOIS CZERWINSKI MEENERZ 72 is 
the manager of Buccaneer Ltd., a woman's 
and junior's clothing store in Denver. 



FREDERICK A. MARINE '72 accepted 
a position as group leader/counselor at 
Angell Civilian Conservation Center, Yac- 
hats, Ore. 

WARREN CREYDT '72 was recently 
promoted to branch manager of Capitol- 
Treaty Co., a division of Capitol Group, 
a plumbing, heating and conditioning, in- 
dustrial and mechanical supply house. 

ROBERT FRECK '72 is manager of 
engineering and quality control at Curtis 
Industries, Inc. in Milwaukee. 

FAYE THOMPSON GESELL '72 re- 
cently accepted a teaching position with 
Elk Mound School District, where she is 
in charge of the preschool program. 

JANET ROIVIN KOCA '72 is an ac- 
countant for Honeywell in Tampa, Fla. 

REX KODERL '72 is the new plant en- 
gineer for the Marshall Division Miles 
Laboratories, Inc. 

JOHN LISKA '72 is a drafting teacher 
at Waupaca Senior High School. 

DONNA HARRIS WOLD '73 is direc- 
tor of the Community Action Program 
Child Care in Janesville. 

JANE ELIZABETH KOCHNOWICZ 
BRANTMIER '73 is currently teaching 
high school home economics and is the 
pom pon advisor at Winneconne. 

JILL PASKE CAPELLE '73 is a sales 
representative for Holiday Wholesale Co. 
in Wisconsin Dells. 

MARY PETERMAN CLARK '73 was 
recently named director of housekeeping 
services for the Radisson Chicago Hotels. 

SANDY FARRISH SULLIVAN '73 is 
the business manager for ten cities in 
Kansas for Schendel Pest Control, Inc. 

GERALD STODOLA '73 has been pro- 
moted to project manager-estimator for 
the Hutter Construction Co., Fond du Lac. 

LYNN VAN EPPS '73 is sales manager 
for Freeland Industries, Inc. in Portage. 

BEVERLY JEANQUART EASTON 
'73 is assistant Manager of JoAnn Fab- 
rics in St. Paul. 

SUSAN BAUMANN '73 is the new 
marketing instructor at Moraine Park 
Technical Institute, Beaver Dam Campus. 

STEVEN SUCHANEK '73 is the Engi- 
neering manager of the water treatment 
division at Sta-Rite Industries, Inc., Deer- 
field. 

ARTHUR HOLLE MS '73 is a high 
school librarian-audio visual coordinator 
and a speech therapy aide in Rice Lake. 

CARL CIHLAR, SR. MS '73 is now a 
psychiatric social worker for the State of 
Nevada. 

MICHAEL CONWILL '73 is the em- 
ployment manager for St. Catherine's Hos- 
pital in Kenosha. 



1974-1975 

LORRAINE BROWN '74 is working 
for TWA as a flight attendant based in 
Chicago. 

JOHN '74 and JUDY SENDELBACH 
KYSELY '76 reside in Milwaukee. He is 
an assistant to the vice president-finance 
of K.C.S. Industry of Milwaukee. She is a 
bridal consultant for J.C. Penney Co. in 
Brown Deer. 

JANET DERBER '74 is teaching sev- 
enth and eighth grade home economics at 
Elmwood Park, 111. 



VICKIE REYNOLDS STANGEL '74 

is employed as an evaluator by the Voca- 
tional Assessment Center in Fond du Lac. 

STRAND WEDUL MS '74 is assistant 
high school principal in Merrill. 

JERRY '74 and BARBARA FESTE 
LA SEE '75 live in Wauwatosa. He is a 
manufacturing engineer for General Elec- 
tric in the medical systems division. She 
is teaching home economics at Greendale 
High School. 

RALPH Ed.S. '74 and JEAN RAINEY 
REEVES MS '75 reside in Mississippi. 
She has been selected by the editorial 
board to appear in the 1978-79'edition of 
Personalities of the South. The selection 
is a result of her outstanding work in the 
field of communication and education. 

MARBLYN KRAUSE '74 was recently 
named 4-H and youth agent for Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin Extension in Kenosha 
County. 

SHARON RITCHEY '74 formerly a 
clinical dietitian at Methodist Hospital, 
Indianapolis, is pursuing her desire and 
interest to write and publish a book on 
"Understanding and Interpreting the Clin- 
ical Significance of Laboratory Values." 

LARRY '74 and MARILYN ANGUS 
COUEY 74 reside in Cos Cob, Conn. He 
is a package development specialist with 
Chesebrough-Pond's Inc. at their corpo- 
rate headquarters in Greenwich, Conn. 

JOHN W. LUI BS 74, MS 75 is cur- 
rently in the Ed.D. program in rehabilita- 
tion administration at Northwestern Uni- 
versity. He is director of Lawrence Gen- 
eral Hospital's department of vocational 
ssrvicBS 

BRADLEY R. LIPMAN MS 74 is em- 
ployed at Color Concept Co., Chicago, as 
assistant laboratory manager. 

SUE ROCKWEILER NOBLE 74 is 
the manager of The Budget Shop in Lan- 

EDWARD 74 and SHARON 
BRANDT KARLMAN 74 reside in Ona- 
laska. He is a social worker for La Crosse 
County. She is a middle school home eco- 
nomics teacher in Onalaska. 

JOHN 74 and JEAN BLUMREICH 
SAGE BS 73, MS 75 reside in Clyman. 
He teaches at Madison Area Technical 
College, Watertown campus. 

EUGENE BLAIR BS 74, MS 77 is 
teaching electronics at Greece Arcadia 
High School. He resides in Rochester, N.Y. 

JAMES BS 74, MS 75 and DONETTE 
MAGUIRE BONK 74 reside in Racine. 
He recently accepted a job as a divisional 
head of media service of the Library/Learn- 
ing Center at UW-Parkside in Kenosha. 
She recently accepted a job with Racine 
Unified Schools with parent child orien- 
tated classroom. 

MARY HELEN JOHNSON 74 was 
named supervisor of the Test Kitchen for 
Tappan Appliance Division. 

BARBARA JEAN MC GINNIS 74 
has returned from serving four years as 
a Peace Corps Volunteer in Brazil, South 
America as a home economist. 

SANDRA AMBROSH PULIS 75 is 
a manager at Hibbing Community College 
Bookstore. 

BARBARA RATHMAN 75 is a mer- 
chandiser for the Zayre Corp. in the home 
offices in Framingham, Mass. 



10 
KIRBY '75 and DIANE GRAHAM 

KLINGER 76 reside in Merrill. He is an 
industrial arts teacher at Medford High 
School. She is the Lincoln County 4-H and 
youth agent in Merrill. 

DENNIS '75 and LYNN MARIE 
QUADRACCI '76 reside in Skokie, 111. 
He has been promoted to supervisor, chem- 
ical process engineering in the chemical 
manufacturing department of Searle Phar- 
maceuticals Division of G.O. Searle. She 
accepted a sales position with the Gerber 
Products Co. 

CONNIE KRUEGER JONES '75 
works in the office of the International 
Fabricare Institute near Washington, D.C. 

KATHERINE KAEMPFER '75 is a 
consultant dietitian for Continental Care 
Centers, Inc., in Omaha, Neb. 

GREGORY MAGNUSON '75 was 
hired as an industrial arts teacher for the 
Merrill Area Public School. 

SABRA ANN MUMFORD MS '75 is 
the assistant professor in the school of 
home economics at Ohio University, 
Athens, Ohio. 

MARY H ANNEMAN '75 has joined the 
home economics staff at the Oster Corp. 
in Milwaukee. 

DEBORAH CONON '75 is working at 
Area Cooperative Education Services in 
New Haven, Conn, in the assessment cen- 
ter as a vocational evaluator. 

DIANE FANSLER MS '75 has been 
selected for inclusion in the fourth edi- 
tion of "The World Who's Who of Women" 
and the eleventh edition of "Who's Who 
in American Women." 

FRED ANDRIST '75 is an industrial 
arts teacher at the Rib Lake High School. 

SALLE TRAUTNER '75 is the home 
visitor of the Project Hope Program in 

SHIRLEY ENGLE '75 teaches home 
economics at Dafoe High School. 

SUZANNE HANNA KLUMB '75 is em- 
ployed by Milwaukee Knit, Inc. for the 
inhouse fabric design and product styling 
division. 

SAM TIJAN '75 is a graphic arts teach- 
er at the Lakeland Union High School. 



1976 

RICHARD BOARDMAN MS is a 

school psychologist for the Prescott Pub- 
lic School. 

SANDY MAYER MORRIS instructs 
child care classes at the Wisconsin Indian- 
head VTAE in New Richmond. 

TERRY and PATRICIA SHOLD 
BOMKAMP reside in Huntington, W. Va. 
He was promoted to food service manager 
at the Ashland Oil Executive Headquar- 
ters for Saga Food Service. She is the 
director of dietary for Lawrence County 
Hospital working for Canteen Corp. 

JUDY NORTH is the director of the 
Teddy Bear Day Care in Bloomer. The Wis- 
consin Early Childhood Association recog- 
nizes Judy as a "Pacesetter in Early Child- 
hood Education" in Chippewa County. 

SUE ANDERSON JOHNSON has 
been appointed to head the Parkside Pre- 
school Center's teaching staff. 

SUSAN LUND KADRMAS is an area 
merchandiser for Maurices, Inc. in Duluth, 
Minn., for their stores in Oregon, Wash- 
ington, Utah and Idaho. 



LISA PHILLIPS ERICKSON is a unit 
manager at St. Mary's Hospital in Roches- 
ter, Minn. 

DIANE WILLIAMS MS is executive 
director of the Vocational Evaluations 
Center-North, Inc., which she developed. 
Located in Rhinelander and patterned af- 
ter VDC-Stout, the center opened in March 
of 1977 and serves northern Wisconsin. 

DEANNA SCHUETZ is teaching home 
economics at Cassville High School. 

BETTE CHE ADLE is teaching at Mon- 
roe High School in Monroe. 

JEFFREYERICKSON graduatedfrom 
Gallaudet College in Washington, D.C. 
with a master of arts degree in education 
of the hearing impaired. He has accepted 
a teaching position at the Florida School 
for the Deaf in St. Augustine, Fla. 

JUDY SUNBERG is a food service su- 
pervisor at the University of Texas in 
Austin. 

BLAKELY SANFORD has been ap- 
pointed business manager of Looking 
Glass, Inc. and Looking Glass Foundation, 
a private non-profit social service agency 
serving juveniles in family crisis inter- 
vention. 

SHARON WASILAS is coordinator of 
customer relations and foreign rights for 
the international sales division of Follet 
Publishing Co. in Chicago. 

DON LILLE VOLD is job placement co- 
ordinator for Horizon House of Illinois 
Valley, Peru, 111. 

SUSAN LEICK is a clinical dietitian 
at Massachusetts General Hospital in Bos- 
ton. 

ANN SHROYER is employed by Ser- 
vice Direction, Inc. of Minneapolis as pa- 
tient service director at Rice Memorial 
Hospital. 

CHUCK HAGEN is a sales representa- 
tive for Ralston Purina Co. in Bismarck, 
N.D. 

JAMES COUEY is a special education 
teacher with the Michigan City, Ind. area 
schools. 

MICHAEL SIEGMUND is employed 
as a technical illustrator at Hamilton In- 
dustries in Two Rivers. 

DONNA SKIDMORE is an assistant 
service manager for Stouffer's Restaurant 
at their Summit Mall Restaurant in Ak- 
ron, Ohio. 

JOHN M. ASHWORTH is an indus- 
trial engineer for Waterloo Industries in 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

BRETT HUSKE is a senior account 
executive, convention and incentive sales, 
for Sheraton Hotels in Hawaii. 

DAVE and CHRIS REDLICH NO- 
LAN have recently relocated to California 
where he has accepted a position as direc- 
tor of sales for Marriott Hotels. 

BARBARA PAHLE is working as an 
infant teacher with the Ramsey County 
Infant Program serving handicapped in- 
fants, 0-18 months of age, on a weekly 
homebound basis. 

RICHARD M. SIEGEL is a food ser- 
vice director for Service Systems, Inc. in 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

BETH M. SPEERSTRA is currently 
employed by New England Deaconess Hos- 
pital, Boston, as clinical dietitian at the 
Joslin Clinic Diabetes Teaching Unit. 

LOU A. TIFFANY is teaching home 
economics at Sauk Rapids High School in 
Minnesota. 



1977 

TERRI LYNN BAKER is a home eco- 
nomics teacher, cheei'leading advisor, and 
girls basketball coach at Urban Junior 
High in Sheboygan. 

KATHLEEN LYNCH FARRELL is a 
vocational evaluator at the St. Paul Re- 
habilitation Center. 

MARY KATHERINE KUIPER is di- 
rector of the Dutch Creek elementary en- 
richment program in Littleton, Colo. 

LINDA T. MARTBSTKOVIC has been 
working at the University of Iowa in Iowa 
City as a food production supervisor. 

EMILY MILLER is a head teacher in 
a Day Care Center in West Bend. 

MARY K. WILSON completed her di- 
etetic internship at St. Luke's Hospital, 
Cleveland, Ohio. She accepted a position 
as clinical dietitian at St. Luke's Hospital, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

DONALD SELLAROLE is a mill en- 
gineer for Hoernor Waldorf. 

DANIEL and DEBORAH PECK 
GROSSKOPH reside in Burnsville, Minn. 
She is employed through the State of Min- 
nesota, Department of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, as a CETA/VR liaison doing 
public relations. 

SALLY BARINA graduated from Hen- 
ry Ford Hospital Dietetic Internship and 
is now a clinical dietitian at Henry Ford 
.Hospital, Detroit. 

' BRIAN BROWN is a production plan- 
ner with International Graphics, Division 
of Moore Business Forms, Minneapolis. 

CHERYL MEYER completed a dietetic 
internship at Milwaukee County Institu- 
tions. 

ADRIS KHAN MS recently transferred 
to Research, Design and Development De- 
partment at Onana Corp. in Fridley, Minn. 

SHARON NELSEN is teaching home 
economics at Cameron High School in 
Cameron. 

RACHEL SPLETT is a Title I, kinder- 
garten and first grade teacher at Turtle 
Lake. 

TOM HABLE is a fire science/service 
coordinator at the Blackhawk Technical 
Institute for the Janesville-Beloit area. 

KAREN VIRNOCHE graduated from 
Administrative Dietetic Internship at 
Oklahoma State University. 

JAN LEA JOHNSON is a vocational 
evaluator at Dexter Regional Vocational 
Center, Dexter, Mich. 

RONALD FISHMAN was recently pro- 
moted to manufacturing engineer for Sys- 
tems and Controls Division of Reliance 
Electric Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

MARCIA DAVIS is associate county 
extension agent in Todd. County, Long 
Prairie, Minn. 

MARK WEBER accepted a new posi- 
tion as an assistant food manager/resi- 
dence hall feeding at Iowa State Univer- 
sity. 

TOM WAGENER has taken a position 
teaching auto mechanics in Eleva-Strum 
High School. 

SCOTT DREGER is a project engineer 
with Amoco Plastic Products Co. in Chip- 
pewa Falls. 

' MARK BAKER is the associate director/ 
chapter liaison for the Wisconsin Restau- 
rant Association. 



PAT TEBERG is an associate food edi- 
tor at Better Homes and Gardens, Meri- 
dith Corp. in Iowa. 

CAROL NOWACK is a home economist 
for Jewel Food Stores in Elk Grove Vil- 
lage, 111. 

WAYNE BECKER accepted a job at 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Resort in Lincoln- 
shire, 111., as a supervisor in the King's 
Wharf Restaurant. 

JOE PHELAN is an assistant food 
director for A.R.A. Services, Milliken Uni- 
versity, Decatur, 111. 



1978 

COLLEEN ROWE is teaching special 
education at Lancaster Senior High School . 

PATRICIA BYE teaches early child- 
hood education at Winskill Elementary. 

RICHARD JOHNSON MS is an archi- 
tectural technology instructor at Clinton 
Community College, Clinton, Iowa. 

JIM KRAJEWSKI is teaching drafting 
and is the freshman basketball coach at 
Monona Grove High School. 

KANDACE KLINNER is a home eco- 
nomics instructor at the Ondossagan Pub- 
lic School in Ondossagan. 

ALAN WACHTENDONK is teaching 
industrial arts at Stockbridge Public 
, Schools in Chilton. 

TIMOTHY MAY has accepted a posi- 
tion with Presto Products of Appleton as 
plant engineer in new products develop- 
ment and research division. 

PAM KIRSCH was hired as teacher/ 
director for Tiny Truckers Day Care in 
Clintonville. 

DENNIS LEONARD teaches industri- 
al arts at the DeForest High School. 

ROBERT ARGALL is an instructor 
at Lakeshore Technical Institute at Cleve- 
land. 

DAVID FEEMSTER accepted a posi- 
tion with Modern Machine Works, Cuda- J 
hy, in the engineering department. 

WENDY JUROVIC is a home econom- 
ics teacher at River Falls High School. 

SCOTT CABOT has been appointed to 
the National Stout Alumni Board of Direc- 
tors for one year to fill the unexpired term 
of KAREN JOHNSON BS '61, MS '62, 
who has been appointed to the Board of 
Business and Industrial Advisors. 

LORI LARSON is teaching home eco- 
nomics at Ottumwa, Iowa High School. 



Laura Kay Watkins to JEROME KRIS- 
TOFF '73, Sept. 23, Pembine. 

Diane E. Crossley to MICHAEL 
JAMES GURDA BS '74, MS '77, Nov. 4, 
in St. Paul. 

SALLY LOUISE PETERSON '74 to 
Douglas Warren Weichmann, Nov. 26, in 
Longboat Island, Fla. 

LUANNE MOLDENHAUER '75 to 
Ron Prochnow, Oct. 14, Menomonie. 

Barbara Lynn Tuss to JAMES NY- 
LAND '75, Oct. 7, Madison. 

MELODI FINN '76 to Gary Peters, 
Oct. 14, Horicon. 

GLADI E. GLENDE '76 to JOHN SIP- 
PEL '72, Oct. 7, Altura, Minn. 

SUSAN MARIE HARTE '76 to Joseph 
John Schlesinger, Oct. 14, in Elm Grove. 

LINDA LOU PETRIE '76 to David 
Clifford Olson, Nov. 25, Sherwood. 

Pamela Sprangers to EUGENE RUP- 
PERT '76, Oct. 21, Freedom. 

CHRISTINE M. SUNDLING '76 to 
John Poston, Aug. 19,' 1978. 

GAIL MARIE TRESS '76 to JEFF- 
REY STEVEN MEIER '77, Oct. 28, Nee- 
nah. 

DIANE CHRISTINE CARRIVEAU 
'77 to Steven Krueger, Oct. 14, Brookfield. 

MAUREEN DALEY '77 to ROBERT 
BEUTLER '75. Couple resides in Rose- 
ville, Minn. 

KAY M. DANIELS MS '77 to Stanley 
Maday, May 8, in Ashland. 

MARGARET JEAN FELLER '77 to 
Daniel Klassy, Sept. 30, Madison. 

MOIRA MC CORMACK '77 to RICH- 
ARD PAUL '78, Sept. 23, Milwaukee. 

Marsha Sigvardt to PETER PETER- 
SON '77, Sept. 2, Port Edwards. 

SUSAN MARIE SLAMAR '77 to Guy 
Keith Elmer, Sept. 30, Wilmot. 

Karen Kay Stuckmann to ROBERT 
ANTHONY ENO '77, Nov. 25, Manitowoc. 

LORI WHEELER '77 to GREGORY 
SZYMANSKI '77, Oct. 14, Menomonie. 

THERESE ZUMWALDE '77 to RICH- 
ARD FLAKER '77, April 8, Minneapolis. 

CHERYL MAE DOCTA '78 to TOM 
FURDER '77, Sept. 9; Forest Park. 

ANN DOWNING '78 to Dean Zielieke, 
Oct. 14, Babcock. Residing in Menomonie. 

Terri Jean Gorr to DAN HOWARD '78, 
Nov. 18, Sheboygan. 

Ellen Lee to PATRICK THIBODEAU 
'78, Sept. 9,' Stillwater, Minn. 

ANNE CHRISTINE SCHNEIDER '78 
to THOMAS LANE WEGE '78, Sept., 
Neenah. 



11 

A daughter, Jamie Anne, Aug. 24, to 
HENRY '69 and LAURA NEUBERG 
NETZINGER '71, Praire du Sac. 

A fourth son, Kevin Michael, Aug. 11, 
to MIKE MS '69 and FAITH GURN BOY- 
ER '69,' Buffalo, N.Y. He is developing a 
vocational evaluation program for the 
Masten Park Community Drug Center in 
Buffalo, N.Y. as part of the New York 
State Penal System. 

A daughter, Jennifer Ann, Nov. 13, to 
GARY BS '68, MS '70 and BARBARA 
JEAN LANGDON SIVERTSEN '70, Ta- 
coma, Wash. He is currently the director 
of the learning resource center at Fort 
Steilacoom Community College in Tacoma. 

A second son, Nicholas Marc, Nov. 6, to 
THOMAS '70 and JANE WELLS REB- 
NE '71, Rockford, 111. 

A son, Robert Ray, Aug. 17, to Terry 
and MARGARET WOOD INGRAM BS 
'70, MS '76. She is the coordinator of in- 
structional graphics at Stout. 

A son, Erin J., Aug. 21, to Mr. and 
Mrs. GERALD OLSON MS '73, Love- 
land, Colo. 

A son, Timothy Alan, Sept. 28, to Mr. 
and Mrs. GENE HARDER '73, Wiscon- 
sin Dells. 

A second son, James Paul, July 18, to 
JOHN '73 and JILL TRZCINSKI GARD- 
NER '72, Milwaukee. 

A second child, Jennifer Ann, April 18, 
to GREG '73 and COLLEEN BARN- 
HART LENTZ '75, Menomonie. 

A son, Justin Michael, Sept. 8, to Mr. 
and Mrs. ROBERT KRAMM '73, Atlanta, 
Ga. 

A- daughter, Amy Marie, May 16, to 
CHARLES '73 and NONA JONES '71, 
Colon, Mich. He is an instructor at Glen 
Oaks Community College, Centerville. She 
is a food service director for Community 
Health Center of Branch Co. 

A daughter, Adrienne Leah, July 27, 
to JON '74 and SUE POTHIER HARTIG 
'76, Clayton. 

A son, Aaron Andrew, Oct. 14, to AN- 
DREW '75 and Karen Meland Clark, West 
Allis. 

A son, Mathew, Sept. 29,' to Mr. and 
Mrs. FRANKLIN MORSE '77, Poynette. 

A daughter, Heidi Ann, Nov. 28, to 
WINFRED '78 and KATHRYN RICH 
DRISCOLL '77, Menomonie. 



Marriages 



Carolyn S. Hynes to GORDON T. 
OVANS, '71, July 29, Wautoma. 

Leslie Jean Masterman to MICHAEL 
EDWARD DORENDORF '71, Nov. 4, 
Stillwater, Minn. 

KATHLEEN A. THEISS '71 to John 
Rosso, May 20. 

CATHERINE ANN MEHRING BS 
'72, MS '74 to Donald Mouney, Nov. 18, 
in Kohler. 



Births 



A fourth child, Mandy Anita, May 16, 
to RICHARD BS '66, MS '68 and CARO- 
LA TAYLOR JOBST '67, Franklin. 

A daughter, Kristin Marie, Nov. 22, to 
Robert and ARLENE ZIELANIS FUL- 
TON BS '67, MS '70, Baton Rouge,La. 



Deaths 



FRANK R. SCHIMELDip 15, 86, Oct. 

25, in San Antonio, Texas. 

IRENE BOESE RUSCH '26, 71, Nov. 

26, Naples, Fla. 

CORA SUNDE WALTERS '28, 74, 
Dec. 13, in La Crosse. 

ARTHUR G. DAUGHERTY '31, 78, 
Nov. 13, Boscobel. 

KRISTIN LIESKE KLEMKE '69, 31, 
Nov. 11, in Marshfield. 



Campus Notes 



A new master of science de- 
gree in hospitality and tourism 
has been approved for Stout, ac- 
cording to an announcement by 
Vice Chancellor Wesley Face. 

The degree is the first of its 
kind in Wisconsin and one of 
only approximately ten com- 
parable programs offered na- 
tionally. "Hospitality and tour- 
ism are major industries in Wis- 
consin, so the program is a 
natural for Wisconsin and for 
Stout," Face said. 



Headlining Stout's 14th An- 
nual Educational Media and 
Technology Conference to be 
held July 16-18, will be Blanche 
Wolls, associate professor, 
Graduate School of Library and 
Information Science, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh and John Wil- 
liams, manager of the multi- 
media section, Keller Crescent 
Co., Evansville, Ind. 



Wolls' topic, "How Do You 
Save an Endangered Species?" 
is aimed at library, audio vi- 
sual and media specialists 
whose jobs have been under 
fire in recent cutbacks by pub- 



Homecoming 79 

This year's Homecoming cel- 
ebration Oct. 19 and 20 will 
honor the Classes of 1944, 1954, 
1964 and 1969. 

In addition to the anniver- 
sary years, alumni committees 
are inviting all alumni to at- 
tend the Saturday night Home- 
coming Banquet, when the re- 
union classes will be recognized 
along with past presidents of 
the Stout Student Association. 

Again this year, Home Eco- 
nomics, Industrial Education 
and Vocational Rehabilitation 
will have workshops Friday, 
Oct. 19. The art department is 
planning a seminar-workshop 
on Friday and an open house 
for all former music depart- 
ment participants will be held 
on Saturday. 



lie schools, libraries and uni- 
versities. 

Williams' presentation, 
"Multi-Image: Can We Learn 
from the Business World?" will 
include examples of commer- 
cial programs that will show 
techniques applicable to educa- 
tional multi-image produc- 
tions. 

Further information may be 
obtained by contacting David 
P. Barnard, Dean of Learning 
Resources. 



Paul Stankavich has been 
named director of Stout Tele- 
production Center, according 
to an announcement by Chan- 
cellor Robert S. Swanson. Stan- 
kavich, 32, succeeds Gregory 
Schubert, who passed away 
earlier this year. 

In his new position, Stanka- 
vich will be responsible for the 
overall operation of the Center, 
one of three major television 
production facilities operated 
by the University of Wisconsin 
System. 




^■tLoly £jl 



i^iy^ 



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address on this side and 
return to post office. 






Return Postage Guaranteed 
Address Correction Requested 





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